Significant nursing figures (Part 3/5)

Throughout November, we’ll take a look back at some of the significant nursing figures who have helped change the face of the registered nursing profession.

From 1964 to 1998, Provincial Council selected a nurse who did something particularly exceptional for honourary membership, which would make them a member for life, as a symbol of their extraordinary work as a nurse.

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5

Yvonne Chapman

Honouary member, 1991

Yvonne influenced many developments in the nursing profession during her 13-year career as executive director for the Alberta Association of Registered Nurses, including in the development of the Nursing Profession Act in 1983, the establishment of graduate nursing education and the move to baccalaureate preparation for nurses.

Yvonne gained a reputation as a skilled negotiator and consulted on many national initiatives.  She chaired the committee that established the Canadian Nurses Protective Society, a national professional liability foundation for registered nurses.

Yvonne Chapman

Yvonne Chapman

Irene Gataint

Honourary member, 1992

Irene pioneered new approaches in nursing education as she sought to improve access to baccalaureate education.  As chair of the nursing program at Red Deer College, Irene proposed the development of a collaborative nursing program to the dean of the faculty of nursing at the University of Alberta.

Her idea to have nurses complete a University of Alberta bachelor of nursing degree, while living in Red Deer, became a model for collaborative nursing education in Alberta, the first of its kind in the country.  At the time, collaboration between universities and colleges was a new phenomenon. This approach is now emulated across the country. She later developed a similar program for nurses at the master’s level.

Irene Gataint

Irene Gataint

Ginette Lemire Rodger

Honouary member, 1993

Dr. Ginette Rodger served as a successful strategist for many projects including the redesigning of the Centre for Gerontology at the University of Alberta; the approval of a conjoint program between the Foothills Hospital, Mount Royal College and the University of Calgary; and modification of the Primary Health Care agenda of the World Health Organization.

Ginette also persuaded the committee writing the Canada Health Act to allow nurses to become a point of entry into the health care system. She was influential in getting the doctorate in nursing program at the University of Alberta funded and aided the University of Calgary in securing government approval for the conjoint baccalaureate nursing program.

Ginette Lemire Rodger

Ginette Lemire Rodger