Significant nursing figures (Part 2/5)

Throughout November, we’ll take a look back at some of the significant nursing figures who have helped change the face of the registered nursing profession.

From 1964 to 1998, Provincial Council selected a nurse who did something particularly exceptional for honourary membership, which would make them a member for life, as a symbol of their extraordinary work as a nurse.

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5

Margaret Steed Henderson

Honourary member, 1982

Margaret earned international recognition as an educator, consultant, author and researcher. Early in her career, she served as Lieutenant Nursing Sister in the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps and as an advisor to schools of nursing in Alberta.

As professor and associate dean at the University of Alberta Faculty of Nursing, Margaret specialized in educational policy and curriculum development. She was also visiting professor at the University of California, University of Western Ontario and the University of Ottawa.

A highly sought out consultant, Margaret was an education consultant to the Canadian Nurses Association; World Health Organization consultant to the Philippines and consultant to several Alberta government committees.

Margaret Steed Henderson

Margaret Steed Henderson

Shirley Stinson

Honourary member, 1991

Dr. Shirley was the first Alberta nurse to earn a doctoral degree, a catalyst in graduate education programs in nursing, and recipient of numerous honourary degrees and awards.

Shirley played a prominent role in establishing Western Canada’s first masters in nursing program at the University of Alberta, then went on to help design the first Canadian doctoral in nursing program. Her vision of using nursing research to improve nursing care lead to the creation of the Alberta Foundation for Nursing Research, where she served as its founding chair.

World-renowned for her work in research, education and administration, Shirley is also a noted author of over 150 publication and provided consultation services in many countries. Shirley’s resume stands as a proud record of a lifetime of work in the advancement of registered nursing in Alberta and around the world.

Shirley Stinson

Shirley Stinson

Peggy Anne Field

President, 1995

Dr. Peggy has won national and international recognition for her work in maternal childcare, midwifery and curriculum development. She spent more than 30 years teaching students at the University of Alberta and served as professor Emeritus for the faculty and on dissertation committees.

Her nursing research led to the development and acceptance of qualitative research as a legitimate approach. The book Nursing Research: The Application of Qualitative Approaches (Field & Morse, 1985) was one of the first texts for nurses on this topic. Peggy Anne also served the College and Association of Registered Nurses of Alberta as a member of Provincial Council, including as vice-president and on various committees.

Peggy Anne Field

Peggy Anne Field